Top Ten Tuesday 17th December – Winter TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that was originally created by The Broke and the Bookish but was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is Winter TBR

I think everyone knows by now that I am a mood reader and don’t make TBR lists so I am borrowing a phrase from my friend Dini and calling this a Winter Possibility Pile! So maybe I’ll get to these books over the Winter season or maybe I won’t…. But for some reason (some more obvious than others) they all feel like Wintry reads to me.

(1) A Shiver of Snow and Sky by Lisa Lueddecke

On the frozen island of Skane, the sky speaks. Beautiful lights appear on clear nights, and their colours have meaning: Green means all is well, and the Goddess is happy. Blue means a snow storm is on the way.

And then there’s red. Red is rare. A warning.

Seventeen years ago, the sky turned red just as Ósa was born, unleashing a plague that claimed the lives of hundreds of villagers, including her own mother. This time, when the night sky once again bleeds crimson, she must discover how to stop the onslaught before so many lives are lost again.

(2) The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey

Alaska, 1920: a brutal place to homestead, and especially tough for recent arrivals Jack and Mabel. Childless, they are drifting apart–he breaking under the weight of the work of the farm; she crumbling from loneliness and despair.

In a moment of levity during the season’s first snowfall, they build a child out of snow. The next morning the snow child is gone–but they glimpse a young, blonde-haired girl running through the trees. This little girl, who calls herself Faina, seems to be a child of the woods. She hunts with a red fox at her side, skims lightly across the snow, and somehow survives alone in the Alaskan wilderness.

As Jack and Mabel struggle to understand this child who could have stepped from the pages of a fairy tale, they come to love her as their own daughter. But in this beautiful, violent place things are rarely as they appear, and what they eventually learn about Faina will transform all of them.

(3) I Am Heathcliff: Stories Inspired by Wuthering Heights edited by Kate Mosse

Sixteen stories inspired by Wuthering Heights.

In Terminus a young woman hides in an empty Brighton hotel; in Thicker Than Blood a man sits in a hot tub stalking his newly-married love on social media; and in A Bird Half-Eaten an amateur boxer prepares for a match.

A woman recalls the Heathcliffs I Have Known and the physical danger she has borne at their hands; in Anima a child and a fox are unified in one startling moment of violence; and in One Letter Different two teenagers walk the moors and face up to their respective buried secrets.

Curated by Kate Mosse and commissioned for Emily Brontë’s bicentenary year in 2018, these fresh, modern stories pulse with the raw beauty and pain of love and are as timely as they are illuminating.

The full list of contributors is:
Leila Aboulela, Hanan Al-Shaykh, Joanna Cannon, Alison Case, Juno Dawson, Louise Doughty, Sophie Hannah, Anna James, Erin Kelly, Dorothy Koomson, Grace McCleen, Lisa McInerney, Laurie Penny, Nikesh Shukla, Michael Stewart and Louisa Young. 

(4) Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

On San Piedro, an island of rugged, spectacular beauty in the Puget Sound, a Japanese-American fisherman stands trial, charged with cold-blooded murder.

It is 1954 and the shadow of World War II, with its brutality abroad and the internment of Japanese-Americans at home, hangs over the courtroom. Ishmael Chambers, who lost an arm in the war and now runs the island newspaper, is among the journalists
covering the trial that brings him close, once again, to Hatsue Miyamoto, the wife of the accused and Ishmael’s never-forgotten first love.

As a heavy snowfall impedes the course of the trial, the whole community Is faced with the ambiguities of justice, the racism that persists even between neighbours, and the necessity of individual moral action, despite the indifference of nature and circumstance.

(5) Shadowsong (Wintersong #2) by S. Jae-Jones

The conclusion to the Wintersong duology.

Six months after the end of Wintersong, Liesl is working toward furthering both her brother’s and her own musical careers. Although she is determined to look forward and not behind, life in the world above is not as easy as Liesl had hoped. Her younger brother Josef is cold, distant, and withdrawn, while Liesl can’t forget the austere young man she left beneath the earth, and the music he inspired in her.

When troubling signs arise that the barrier between worlds is crumbling, Liesl must return to the Underground to unravel the mystery of life, death, and the Goblin King—who he was, who he is, and who he will be. What will it take to break the old laws once and for all? What is the true meaning of sacrifice when the fate of the world—or the ones Liesl loves—is in her hands?

(6) The Call of the Wild by Jack London

Life is good for Buck in Santa Clara Valley, where he spends his days eating and sleeping in the golden sunshine.

But one day a treacherous act of betrayal leads to his kidnap, and he is forced into a life of toil and danger. Dragged away to be a sledge dog in the harsh and freezing cold Yukon, Buck must fight for his survival.

Can he rise above his enemies and become the master of his realm once again? 

(7) The Road by Cormac McCarthy

A searing, post apocalyptic novel destined to become Cormac McCarthy’s masterpiece.

A father and his son walk alone through burned America.

Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark.

Their destination is the coast, although they don’t know what, if anything, awaits them there.

They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other.

(8) Boy Snow Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

Boy Novak turns twenty and decides to try for a brand-new life. Flax Hill, Massachusetts, isn’t exactly a welcoming town, but it does have the virtue of being the last stop on the bus route she took from New York. Flax Hill is also the hometown of Arturo Whitman –- craftsman, widower, and father of Snow.

Snow is mild-mannered, radiant and deeply cherished –- exactly the sort of little girl Boy never was, and Boy is utterly beguiled by her. If Snow displays a certain inscrutability at times, that’s simply a characteristic she shares with her father, harmless until Boy gives birth to Snow’s sister, Bird.

When Bird is born Boy is forced to re-evaluate the image Arturo’s family have presented to her, and Boy, Snow and Bird are broken apart.

Sparkling with wit and vibrancy, Boy, Snow, Bird is a deeply moving novel about three women and the strange connection between them. It confirms Helen Oyeyemi’s place as one of the most original and dynamic literary voices of her generation.

(9) In the Light of What We See by Sarah Painter

Brighton, 1938: Grace Kemp is pushed away by the family she has shamed. Rejected and afraid, she begins a new life as a nurse. But danger stalks the hospital too, and she’ll need to be on her guard to avoid falling into familiar traps. And then there are the things she sees…Strange portents that have a way of becoming real.

Eighty years later, Mina Morgan is brought to the same hospital after a near-fatal car crash. She is in terrible pain but recalls nothing. She’s not even sure whom to trust. Mina too sees things that others cannot, but now, in hospital, her visions are clearer than ever…

Two women, separated by decades, are drawn together by a shared space and a common need to salvage their lives.

(10) If I Stay by Gayle Forman

Choices. Seventeen-year-old Mia is faced with some tough ones: Stay true to her first love—music—even if it means losing her boyfriend and leaving her family and friends behind?

Then one February morning Mia goes for a drive with her family, and in an instant, everything changes. Suddenly, all the choices are gone, except one. And it’s the only one that matters.

If I Stay is a heartachingly beautiful book about the power of love, the true meaning of family, and the choices we all make.

I’ve technically read If I Stay before but I can’t remember much about it but I really want to read the sequel, Where She Went, so I think a wintry reread might be in order!


And that’s this week’s Winter TBR which will most likely not be adhered to at all….

28 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday 17th December – Winter TBR

  1. AH, you’ve just reminded me that I have Snow Falling on Cedars on my shelf and it’s one that I’ve been wanting to read for a while now! I have that same book cover and I absolutely love these editions. So pretty! 😍 Lots on here I haven’t heard of and some that I also want to read. I hope you manage to get to all of them, Emer! Happy reading 💙

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to admit… I recognise almost no books on your list but I enjoyed reading about them. Thanks for sharing the blurbs on them 😄 I’m not one to read too much lit but some of them seem interesting if not a bit too deep for me! I’m really keen to finish off Wintersong though. I got half way through but unfortunately hit a pause on my fantasy phase. It’ll be one of the first ones I pick back up in the New Year 🙏 I wasn’t much of a fan of If I Stay but I hope you enjoy the reread!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow awesome list! Very wintery!! I read the snow child a while ago, I remember it to be quite a beautiful story and I loved it! Definitely an interesting book I hope you enjoy it! I hope you enjoy all of them! 😊💜❄

    Liked by 1 person

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